A successful business isn’t a flash fire; it’s a slow burn. As you establish yours, you’ll face numerous operational and legal issues—from hiring, managing, and compensating personnel, to maintaining data privacy and security, to finding ways to capitalize on opportunities for strategic partnerships and alliances. You know that each step you take needs to be a step in the right direction, or else it may be a step backwards.

We can help.

  • Effect of Tax Reform on Family Offices
    On December 22, 2017, President Trump signed into law tax reform legislation (the “Act”) formerly known as the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act. Under the Act, miscellaneous itemized deductions that had been available to individual taxpayer’s to reduce taxable income are suspended from 2018 through 2025. Such miscellaneous itemized deductions include items such as unreimbursed employee business expenses, tax return preparation costs, cost incurred in contesting taxes, hobby expenses, investment expenses, and expenses for the production or collection of income among others.
  • Research by Paul Hastings Shows Non-Cash Payments Across U.S. and UK to Soar by 2026
    The value of non-cash payments in the US and UK will reach $46 trillion and £1.44 trillion respectively by 2026, new research from leading global law firm Paul Hastings shows today.
  • Effect of Tax Cuts and Jobs Act on Businesses
    On December 22, 2017, President Trump signed into law tax legislation formerly known as the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (the “Act”). This most comprehensive tax overhaul since 1986 creates significant opportunities to minimize a business entity’s overall tax burden. Set forth below are some of the key business taxation provisions of the Act:
  • New Tax Law Adversely Affects Certain Executive and Equity Compensation Arrangements
    President Trump signed into law tax reform legislation containing provisions that impact executive compensation and equity-based compensation.
  • States Prevail Over E-Commerce Companies in Battle for Sales Taxes
    The U.S. Supreme Court issued a landmark decision on June 21, 2018 in South Dakota v. Wayfair, Inc., which held that states may require retailers to collect sales taxes even if the retailer had no physical presence in the state.